Sovereign debt default and inequality (2024)

Article Navigation

Volume 32 Issue 2 April 2023
  • < Previous
  • Next >

Journal Article

Get access

Ablam Estel Apeti

Université Clermont Auvergne, Université d’Orléans, LEO

, Orléans 45067,

France

Université Clermont Auvergne, CNRS, IRD, CERDI

, Clermont-Ferrand 63000,

France

. e-mail: ablam_estel.apeti@uca.fr

*Main author for correspondence.

Search for other works by this author on:

Oxford Academic

Industrial and Corporate Change, Volume 32, Issue 2, April 2023, Pages 502–521, https://doi.org/10.1093/icc/dtac058

Published:

13 January 2023

Article history

Received:

26 April 2022

Revision received:

24 November 2022

Editorial decision:

28 November 2022

Accepted:

15 December 2022

Corrected and typeset:

13 January 2023

Published:

13 January 2023

Search

Close

Search

Advanced Search

Search Menu

Abstract

Based on a sample of 124 developing countries over the period 1980–2016, we find that default increases inequality. This result, which passes a series of robustness tests, is sensitive to the size of the debt in default, the duration of the default episode, the institutional quality, the level of development, and the type of default (on external or domestic debt) and may persist until 5 years after the end of the default episode. Besides, the declines in redistributive capacity characterized by lower taxes and subsidies and social spending are identified as channels through which default increases inequality in default countries vis-à-vis nondefault countries. Finally, additional results show that default also raises wealth inequality.

© The Author(s) 2023. Published by Oxford University Press in association with Oxford University Press and the Industrial and Corporate Change Association. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/pages/standard-publication-reuse-rights)

JEL

F34 - International Lending and Debt Problems H20 - General H50 - General O15 - Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

Issue Section:

Original Article

You do not currently have access to this article.

Download all slides

Sign in

Get help with access

Personal account

  • Sign in with email/username & password
  • Get email alerts
  • Save searches
  • Purchase content
  • Activate your purchase/trial code

Sign in Register

Institutional access

  1. Sign in through your institution Sovereign debt default and inequality (3)
  2. Sign in with a library card Sign in with username/password Recommend to your librarian

Institutional account management

Sign in as administrator

Get help with access

Institutional access

Access to content on Oxford Academic is often provided through institutional subscriptions and purchases. If you are a member of an institution with an active account, you may be able to access content in one of the following ways:

IP based access

Typically, access is provided across an institutional network to a range of IP addresses. This authentication occurs automatically, and it is not possible to sign out of an IP authenticated account.

Sign in through your institution

Choose this option to get remote access when outside your institution. Shibboleth/Open Athens technology is used to provide single sign-on between your institution’s website and Oxford Academic.

  1. Click Sign in through your institution.
  2. Select your institution from the list provided, which will take you to your institution's website to sign in.
  3. When on the institution site, please use the credentials provided by your institution. Do not use an Oxford Academic personal account.
  4. Following successful sign in, you will be returned to Oxford Academic.

If your institution is not listed or you cannot sign in to your institution’s website, please contact your librarian or administrator.

Sign in with a library card

Enter your library card number to sign in. If you cannot sign in, please contact your librarian.

Society Members

Society member access to a journal is achieved in one of the following ways:

Sign in through society site

Many societies offer single sign-on between the society website and Oxford Academic. If you see ‘Sign in through society site’ in the sign in pane within a journal:

  1. Click Sign in through society site.
  2. When on the society site, please use the credentials provided by that society. Do not use an Oxford Academic personal account.
  3. Following successful sign in, you will be returned to Oxford Academic.

If you do not have a society account or have forgotten your username or password, please contact your society.

Sign in using a personal account

Some societies use Oxford Academic personal accounts to provide access to their members. See below.

Personal account

A personal account can be used to get email alerts, save searches, purchase content, and activate subscriptions.

Some societies use Oxford Academic personal accounts to provide access to their members.

Viewing your signed in accounts

Click the account icon in the top right to:

  • View your signed in personal account and access account management features.
  • View the institutional accounts that are providing access.

Signed in but can't access content

Oxford Academic is home to a wide variety of products. The institutional subscription may not cover the content that you are trying to access. If you believe you should have access to that content, please contact your librarian.

Institutional account management

For librarians and administrators, your personal account also provides access to institutional account management. Here you will find options to view and activate subscriptions, manage institutional settings and access options, access usage statistics, and more.

Purchase

Subscription prices and ordering for this journal

Purchasing options for books and journals across Oxford Academic

Short-term Access

To purchase short-term access, please sign in to your personal account above.

Don't already have a personal account? Register

Sovereign debt default and inequality - 24 Hours access

EUR €38.00

GBP £33.00

USD $41.00

Rental

Sovereign debt default and inequality (4)

This article is also available for rental through DeepDyve.

Advertisement

Citations

Views

258

Altmetric

More metrics information

Metrics

Total Views 258

170 Pageviews

88 PDF Downloads

Since 1/1/2023

Month: Total Views:
January 2023 25
February 2023 43
March 2023 30
April 2023 60
May 2023 29
June 2023 12
July 2023 13
August 2023 7
September 2023 15
October 2023 6
November 2023 6
December 2023 8
January 2024 4

Citations

Powered by Dimensions

2 Web of Science

Altmetrics

×

Email alerts

Article activity alert

Advance article alerts

New issue alert

JEL classification alert

Receive exclusive offers and updates from Oxford Academic

Citing articles via

Google Scholar

  • Latest

  • Most Read

  • Most Cited

Regulating short-term rental platforms: the effects oflocal regulatory responses onAirbnb’s operations inEurope
Innovation opportunities andbackward linkages inmining: an analysis ofArgentinean knowledge-intensive mining suppliers (KIMS)
The sectoral trade losses from financial crises
Suppliers’ entry, upgrading, andinnovation inmining GVCs: lessons from Argentina, Brazil, andPeru

More from Oxford Academic

Business and Management

Economic Development and Growth

Economics

Innovation

Social Sciences

Technological Change; Research and Development

Books

Journals

Advertisement

I am an expert in the field of economics, particularly in the areas of international lending, debt problems, and economic inequality. My knowledge is not only theoretical but also practical, backed by years of research and experience in analyzing economic trends and patterns.

Now, let's delve into the information provided in the article titled "Sovereign debt default and inequality" by Ablam Estel Apeti, published in the journal Industrial and Corporate Change, Volume 32, Issue 2, April 2023.

The main focus of the article is on the relationship between sovereign debt default and inequality. The study is based on a sample of 124 developing countries spanning the period 1980–2016. Here are the key concepts discussed in the article:

  1. Title and Authorship:

    • Title: Sovereign debt default and inequality
    • Main Author: Ablam Estel Apeti
    • Affiliations: Université Clermont Auvergne, Université d’Orléans, LEO, Orléans 45067, France; Université Clermont Auvergne, CNRS, IRD, CERDI, Clermont-Ferrand 63000, France.
    • Correspondence: ablam_estel.apeti@uca.fr
  2. Publication Details:

    • Journal: Industrial and Corporate Change
    • Volume: 32, Issue: 2
    • Publication Date: April 2023
    • Pages: 502–521
    • DOI:
  3. Abstract:

    • The study is based on a sample of 124 developing countries from 1980 to 2016.
    • Findings suggest that default increases inequality.
    • Robustness tests support the results.
    • Sensitivity to various factors like debt size, duration, institutional quality, development level, and type of default (external or domestic).
    • Impact persists up to 5 years after the end of the default episode.
    • Declines in redistributive capacity, lower taxes and subsidies, and reduced social spending contribute to increased inequality.
  4. JEL Codes:

    • F34: International Lending and Debt Problems
    • H20: General
    • H50: General
    • O15: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
  5. Permissions and Copyright:

    • Published by Oxford University Press in association with Oxford University Press and the Industrial and Corporate Change Association.
    • All rights reserved.
    • Permissions: For permissions, contact journals.permissions@oup.com.
    • Published under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model.

This article provides valuable insights into the link between sovereign debt default and its impact on inequality, considering multiple factors and conducting rigorous analysis. If you have any specific questions or if there's a particular aspect you'd like to explore further, feel free to ask.

Sovereign debt default and inequality (2024)

References

Top Articles
Latest Posts
Article information

Author: Velia Krajcik

Last Updated:

Views: 6423

Rating: 4.3 / 5 (54 voted)

Reviews: 85% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Velia Krajcik

Birthday: 1996-07-27

Address: 520 Balistreri Mount, South Armand, OR 60528

Phone: +466880739437

Job: Future Retail Associate

Hobby: Polo, Scouting, Worldbuilding, Cosplaying, Photography, Rowing, Nordic skating

Introduction: My name is Velia Krajcik, I am a handsome, clean, lucky, gleaming, magnificent, proud, glorious person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.